Are You Ready For MOUNT NINJI AND DA NICE TIME KID Tour?
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Die Antwoord are back in FULL EFFECT with a high energy new album MOUNT NINJI AND DA NICE TIME KID and with the release are wasting no time and hitting the road with it.
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Home » Electro Parlour, Music

Atrak Shines A Light On The Eternal Question that Electronic Music Needs To Answer

Submitted by on July 7, 2015 – 11:33 amNo Comment

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Atrak has always been a pioneer, originator and curator of great music. Now he is being the first voice to actually tackle one of the most, if not, the most slippery slopes in Electronic Music. What is #RealDjing. In this post A-Trak puts forward some well thought out and articulate views on what #RealDjing is. But one voice alone, will not put an end to this debate.

Are You Real Djing? Atrak and the “RealDjing” Debate 

Since August, the internet has been abuzz over A-Trak’s real DJing campaign. The turntablist took to Instagram with a passionate post about what real DJing is and how it has evolved through the years. A-Trak shares his experience of shifting from analog to digital DJing, while still keeping his performances authentic. The post is seen as A-Trak’s response to mounting criticism that DJs are nothing more than button pushers.

What is Real DJing?

A-Trak begins the post saying, “There’s a lot of talk lately about what DJing is becoming. I’ve seen it evolve a lot over the years. I started DJing when I was 13, scratching vinyl and playing strictly hip hop, winning championships. The DMC judges thought I was pretty good at it, but think my definition was narrow back then.”

I remember when my aunts and uncles found out I was a DJ they assumed I was the guy talking on the radio. So to define who we were, we called ourselves turntablists. We wanted legitimacy. As I grew up I got into more sides of the craft. Party-rocking and mastering different musical genres. In the early 2000’s I was Serato’s very first endorsee. I remember talking to Jazzy Jeff and AM about Serato: was it stable enough? We also had to convert all our music. DJing was becoming digital. Then Kanye hired me to tour with him, because he learned how to perform from Common and Kweli who had real DJs too – shout out to Dummy & Ruckus. We went on an Usher tour and Kanye wanted me to bust solos. My routines were too specialized so I had to make new ones that this new audience would understand.”

A-Trak continued on to address new and evolving DJ technology, “I started seeing the bigger picture. Then I got into electronic music. I remember seeing Mehdi, Boys Noize, Feadz playing on CDJs and thinking: these guys are turntablists too. Surkin was the first guy I saw DJ on Ableton in a way that felt like true DJing too. Now there’s a whole new cast in electronic music, and it’s still exciting to me. I’ve seen a lot of fads come and go over the years. And I don’t think my way of DJing is the only way. I wish I could also play like Carl Cox and DJ Harvey too. But I have my style and it’s my passion. I love standing for something that means something, as Pharcyde would say. When you come to my show you know you’ll see me cut. And take risks. DJing is about taking risks. I represent #RealDJing #YouKnowTheDifference”

Support #RealDjing, Not Playing a Pre-Recorded Mix and Fist Pumping.

Story By Matthew Freter  Photo By Ftfphotography

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