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Home » Literature

An intimate encounter with the “last living slut”

Submitted by on December 12, 2012 – 2:45 amNo Comment

Roxana Shirazi’s story is one of unadulterated sexual excess. She’s been pissed on by Avenged Sevenfold, knocked up by Dizzy Reed and she’s fucked three-quarters of Buckcherry. In few words, she’s what Josh Todd once coined a “crazy bitch.”

Shirazi’s backstage antics are legendary. She rarely catches a concert without a purse laced with condoms and K-Y, and is notorious for having done back flips in tour buses from London to LA. The name’s of the bands she’s taken to bat range from Adler’s Appetite to Velvet Revolver.

Yet she eschews the “groupie” tag. Shirazi’s an educated woman, strong-willed and intelligent. In The Last Living Slut, she invites readers into a world where sex, rock and roll and, to a lesser extent, drugs, represent the ultimate freedom from unsavory circumstances – a world where it’s ok for both men and women to explore the depths of their desires.

The book follows Shirazi, first through turbulent early years in Iran, as a girl too curious for her culture who, abandoned by her father and left to a single mother, finds solace in the comfort of any man who will pay her attention. Later, as a teenager in England, TLLS explores how she escaped a “bleak existence” masturbating to videos of rock stars like Axl Rose and Slash (who she, coincidentally, recently wooed).

“Watching rockers playing their instruments onstage was foreplay,” writes Shirazi in TLLS. “Making out with ravishing rockers afterward was the only way I got off.”

Rather than sit back and wet dream about the rockers on her TV screen, Shirazi ran away and joined the circus. Documented in TLLS is her raw, first-hand account of what it takes to make it, as a woman who can’t play an instrument, in rock and roll.

From full-band orgies to candlelit dinners, Shirazi’s book provides an insider’s insight into the good and bad that is sex and music. The underlying message of TLLS, says Shirazi, is as much about sexuality and freedom as it is about one woman’s trials and triumphs, her ultimate highs, and her ultimate lows.

***

“There definitely has been an anarchist streak in me since I was a child. From a very young age I was taught you always have to fight for your rights, not to be what society tells you, just to be yourself.”

Shirazi pulls no punches commenting on her childhood and what led up to the events that contributed to her notoriety. She uses “anti” aplenty, as in “anti-monarchy” and “anti-establishment,” to describe the impact being raised under strict Islamic rule had on her sexual and emotional upbringing.

“When I used to go to Koran classes, I would come home and play dirty, little naughty games with my male neighbours and cousins,” she recalls. “It was a real resistance against being oppressed and being told what to do.”

Born in a military hospital in Tehran, Iran – a country then under the rule of totalitarian emperor Mohammad Rez? Sh?h Pahlavi – she remembers learning early in life how to break the rules and keep the boys at bay. In TLLS Shirazi, seemingly inadvertently, juxtaposes early childhood games of chicken-and-go with latter day “water polo” matches in the washrooms of tour buses.

Shirazi stresses it was “a combination of a few things” that first turned her on to rock and roll. “I was really sexual even when I was 12 or 13,” she says. “And, because of my circumstances, that sexual thing always became a piece of freedom, a route out of my normal life.”

In the TLLS, Shirazi recalls her teenage years with regret. A nerdy Iranian immigrant who landed in London at a tender age, she writes of years of physical and emotional torment, at the hands of her step-dad and schoolmates.

“At school I was known as the silent, smelly Paki and bullied with much glee and fanfare,” she writes. “‘Fuckin’ Paki, she ain’t no Brit! Skin is brown and she smells like shit.’”

The kids in the yard slandered Shirazi with racist slurs, while at home her step-dad, unable to speak English or find work in his adopted country, unleashed his insecurities on her, beating her whenever he felt like it.

“I had a very bleak life in England,” she recalls, “so I think the sexual thing represented – it was a symbol – an escape from the daily grind of reality.”

Since writing TLLS, Shirazi has spent time in therapy and says she realizes now that not only was it the pressure of growing up in Iran or the abuse she faced in England that forced her to lust the attention of rock stars and bad boys. It was a longing to reclaim someone lost at an early age.

“I had never had therapy when I wrote the book and I never had insight into my actions or why I did certain things,” she reflects. “Looking back and analyzing things, I have realized that it is true that you make choices like that based on things that happened to you in your childhood. I think definitely with me it’s to do with the fact that my earliest feelings as a child were of trying to get my dad to want me.”

Shirazi writes in TLLS of how she broke when abandoned at an early age by her opium-addicted father, of how her revolutionary mother – who fought the iron rule of Iran’s leaders at every turn – was forced to raise her daughter as a single mother, until she remarried years later.

Asked how her mother felt about the book, Shirazi is again honest. “My mum was like, ‘yeah, it’s great you’ve written a book.’ And then when it came out and she heard about it she was like, ‘oh, I see. Why did you do that picture with you in an Islamic hijab and you pretending to stick your tongue out and do some obscene thing?’

“I was really, really reluctant because it was a taboo secret life and no one knew about it. They’re all a bit taken aback by the things I’ve written about,” she says of the reaction of her family members to the book.” “They were all for me being sexually open, but I don’t think they expected how explicit the book would be.”

***

While The Last Living Slut may seem a somewhat presumptuous title for a book by a first-time author, it does well in painting a picture of groupies – namely Roxana and her close friends – as women of value, in life and rock and roll.

As she writes in the foreword, “I am the last living ‘slut’ embodying the negative meaning of the word, and the first living ‘slut’ embodying a new, positive, and celebrated meaning of the word.”

To that end, Shirazi manages a feat she stresses she was only “trying to attempt.” That is, the reclamation of a word that has caused more break-ups and fist fights than adultery and liquor, respectively: Slut.

“Slut means having sex with lots of different people, it doesn’t make you a cruel, mean, selfish, rude, horrible person,” says the soft-spoken vixen. “I was attempting to sort of say, can we look at this word more closely and think why we use it in such a negative way,” she continues, “why there’s such a stigma attached to it for women who are sexually active.”

Shirazi questions, both in TLLS and over the phone from her London flat, why promiscuous men in 2010 continue to be looked on as viral, while lascivious women are often vilified for the same sexual acts.

“There’s no way a woman would become famous for having lots of sex,” she reasons. “In the rock world there were guys who did exactly what I did and were looked on in society as more sexual, powerful. I was trying to understand why females and males have completely different rules applied to them in this day and age.”

A young bombshell with a bright brain, Shirazi holds an MA in English and speaks on the subject of gender and identity at conferences worldwide. She also writes for the Huntington Post and is preparing a piece about sex parties in Iran for Hustler magazine.

Asked how she manages to hold the two distinct sides of her life together, Shirazi laughs. “With great difficulty. I can’t hang out with people who are really academic because they won’t understand my need to be really rock and roll. And vice versa, with a rock band I can’t talk to them about philosophy and political science.

“On the one side, I’m a real academic geek. And on the other hand, I’m like a dirty porn star.”

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